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  1. I don't understand why people who've been under general anesthetics would ever continue to believe that consciousness is not generated by their body and consequently does not and can not exist after death. I mean, seriously, youv'e experienced the nothingness!

    about 16 days ago from web
    1. @oracle I have some negating grammar mistakes in this statement, but I think that the point can still be understood. Sorry, I haven't spoken or written in English for a few days.

      about 16 days ago from web
    2. @oracle I've been under general recently and it hasn't really discounted the idea. If anything waking up afterwards is disorienting enough that I wondered if I'd died on the table

      about 16 days ago from web
      1. @tiff Consciness is a thing that exists, no one understands the complexity and specifics of it. After we die, we either remain conscience or we don't. In the event that we do, this means that the body, was not the origin of conciseness. However, if that is true, than why is there nothing when you are under anesthetics? My point is simply that the lack of conciseness that can be observed when the body is altered to not create it is evidence that consciences is "generated" by the body and therefore it would be sound to suggest that there is no consciousness after death.

        about 16 days ago from web
        1. @oracle I wouldn't consider an induced coma the same experience as death necessarily. Maybe deathconsciousness is like a dream you don't remember when you wake up. Maybe it's not consciousness at all. It's a falsifiable statement with the catch that someone has to die to prove it wrong. Incidentally, what have the people who claim to have died and come back to life said about it?

          about 15 days ago from MuSTArDroid
          1. @tiff There is a very strong difference in brain activity between general anesthetics and comas. You know how when you wake up in the morning or from a nap you can sense the time has passed? This is because the brain's perception of time comes from it's ability to process information and form memories, something that the brain is made unable to do when under anesthetics but still semi functional when in a coma, and very functional while in most stages of sleep. In my personal experience from drowning in resort pool on vacation I can say a few things about OBE/NDEs. First, drowning is an awful terrible and slow way to die (I guess that's off topic) Any who, we know, and can prove, that when people are having near death experiences that they are, in fact, alive. More importantly, we know that the brain can actively form memories in these states. Knowing this, we can't honestly use them as examples of what ACTUAL potentially conscienceless death would be like.

            about 15 days ago from web
            1. @oracle fair. the only point i staunchly stand by really is that a lack of proof of one thing isn't proof of another thing

              about 15 days ago from web
              1. @tiff That brought flashbacks from my philosophy classes on the subjects of "Absence of Evidence" and "Evidence of Absence" how they relate, how or when they can be interchanged, god it's complicated logic. I would agree with you, however, that it IS fair to use that in these in-testable circumstances though.

                about 15 days ago from web
    3. @oracle i never was taught this and thankfully, to a point, being knocked out like this did nothing but affirm my beliefs.

      about 16 days ago from web
    4. @oracle I guess some people would say that the "soul" is still in the body. It is fascinating that while under, the brain actually remains very active, just not conscious. So if a "soul" was still in the body, would they argue that the body is somehow in more control than the soul? If consciousness originates from the soul and not the brain, than why aren't people aware even when we turn off that functionality of the brain? I'm sorry, it just doesn't make any sense

      about 16 days ago from web
    5. @oracle i let myself be choked out for science once. Now that was an experiance. Weird dreams and apperantly I had a micro seziure. And one hell of a sore neck.

      about 14 days ago from MuSTArDroid
      1. @firestormdangerdash Wow, that's intense! Where was this? Did they pay you?

        about 14 days ago from web
        1. @oracle nah, asked one of my sisters older friends to do it to me when I was 12 or 14.

          about 13 days ago from MuSTArDroid